Conferences: Location Intelligence and RDBMS Systems

I miss out on all the cool conferences, like Location Intelligence.
Now, I am not much into GIS, but I have a side-interest in IP to location mapping (the now defunct GrabIP project, as an example), and have been working giving feedback on a project that someone has been building using the type of basic geographic information I gather in the IP database I created.
Now Radar is trying to develop a little buzz for PostgreSQL by discussing how many of the GIS firms use it.
I agree that Postgres is far more advanced than MySQL, but for most Web development, the level of transactional complexity that is available in Postgres is far beyond what is needed.
For example, using Postgres for anything that I do is like using an elephant to open a can of sardines. But using MySQL to manage a complex GIS system would be like an orange trying to drive a Porsche.
Each system has its place in the open source world.

4 Replies to “Conferences: Location Intelligence and RDBMS Systems”

  1. PostgreSQL might have more sophisticated transactional capabilities, but what makes it interesting to the geospatial community is its geospatial operators and indexing. PostgreSQL integrated this tightly into the database, for good performance. MySQL elected to implement them at a higher, slower, level in their codebase because it was easier to do that. And, of course, PostgreSQL had the geospatial operators way before MySQL.
    It’s not like transactions, where people could fudge along without transactions until MySQL offered them. Without geospatial operators, you might as well not attempt to store locations in a database. So although MySQL was late to the game with transactions, it didn’t hurt them with most people. With people who care about geospatial stuff, not having geospatial operators was a deal-killer.

  2. It’s not like transactions, where people could fudge along without transactions until MySQL offered them. Without geospatial operators, you might as well not attempt to store locations in a database. So although MySQL was late to the game with transactions, it didn’t hurt them with most people. With people who care about geospatial stuff, not having geospatial operators was a deal-killer.

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