Web Performance Trends 2013 – Third Party Services

Every site has them. Whether they’re for analytics, advertising, customer support, or CDN services, third-party services are here to stay. However, for 2013, I believe that these services will face a level of scrutiny that many have avoided up until now.
Recent performance trends indicate that while web site content has been tested and scaled to meet even the highest levels of traffic, the third-party services that these sites have some to rely on (with a few exceptions) are not yet prepared to handle the largest volumes of traffic that occur when many of their customers experience a peak on the same day.
In 2013, I see web site owners asking their third-party service providers to provide verification that their systems be able to handle the highest volumes of traffic on their busiest days, with an additional amount of overhead – I suggest 20% – available for growth and to absorb “super-spikes”. Customer experience is built on the performance of the entire site, so leaving a one component of site delivery untested (and definitely unmonitored!) leaves companies exposed to brand and reputation degradation as well as performance degradation.
In your own organizations, make 2013 the year you:

  • Implement tight controls over how outside content is deployed and managed
  • Implement tight change control policies that clearly describe the process for adding third-party content to your site, including the measurement of performance impacts
  • Define clear SLAs and SLOs for your third-party content providers, including the performance levels at which their content will be disabled or removed from the site.

When speak to your third-party content and service providers about their plans for 2013, ask them to:

  • Explicitly detail how they handled traffic on their busiest days in 2012, and what they plan to do to effectively handle growth in 2013
  • Clearly demonstrate how they are invested in helping their customers deliver successful mobile sites and apps in 2013
  • Lay out how they will provide more transparent access to system performance metrics and what the goals of their performance strategy for 2013 are.

Take control of your third-party content. Don’t let it control you.

The Rule of Thirds: The Web Performance Analyst

Blurry Man - Brian Auer - http://www.flickr.com/photos/brianauer/2929494868/Recently, there has been a big push for the Dev/Ops culture, an integrated blending of development and operations who work closely together to ensure that poor performing web and mobile applications don’t make it out the door. They have become the rockstars of the conference circuit and the employment boards.
I fit into neither of these categories. I have never run anything more than a couple of linux servers with Apache and MySQL. I write code because I’m curious, not because I’m good at it – in fact, I write the worst code in the world and I am willing to prove it!
I am a member of a web and mobile performance culture that is language and platform independent, to use some buzzwords.
I am a web and mobile performance consultant and analyst.
I can take apart reams of data to find statistical patterns and anomalies. I believe that averages are evil, and have believed this for more than a decade. I have been using frequency and percentile distributions for almost as long and watched as the industry finally caught up.
I can link the business issue that faces your company with the technical concerns you are facing and help guide you to the middle ground where performance and the balance sheet are in careful equilibrium.
I don’t care what you write your code in. I don’t care what you run it on. Now, don’t get me wrong: I respect and admire the Dev/Ops folks I have met and know. I am just not in their tribe.